CARING TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE
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YOUR HEALTH
Debbie Iliff
Debbie Iliff - Community Outreach Coordinator
Ten Tips to Help Control
Your High Blood Pressure

  1. Make sure your blood pressure is under 140/90. If your systolic pressure (the top number) is over 140, ask your doctor what you can do to lower it.

  2. Take your blood pressure medicine, if prescribed every day.

  3. Aim for a healthy weight if you are overweight or obese, carrying this extra weight increase your risk of high blood pressure.

  4. Increase your physical activity. Do at least 30 minutes of moderate activity, such as walking most days of the week. You can do 30 minutes in three 10-minute segments.

  5. Choose foods low in salt or sodium. Most Americans should consume no more than 2.4 grams (2,400 milligrams) of sodium a day. That equals about one teaspoon of table salt a day.

  6. Read nutrition labels. Almost all packaged foods contain sodium. Every time you eat a packaged food, know how much sodium is in one serving.

  7. Keep a sodium diary. You may be surprised at how much sodium you consume each day and the diary will help you decide which foods to decrease or eliminate.

  8. Use spices and herbs instead of salt to season the food you prepare at home.

  9. Eat more fruits, vegetables, grains and low dairy foods; check out the DASH diet plan for delicious menu ideas.

  10. If you consume alcohol at all, consume moderate amounts.

About Debbie Iliff
Debbie Iliff, Community Outreach Coordinator for Grove City Medical Center is a certified community health education specialist. Previously, she worked as a health educator for the Ashtabula (Ohio) County Department of Health, implementing a number of sustaining health programs for the county, as well as administering their cardiovascular health grant for over a decade.

Debbie is a walking encyclopedia of information when it comes to public health issues. Her special areas of interest include safe food handling, communicable disease prevention, diabetes management and hidden sugars in everyday foods.

Along with developing and coordinating Grove City Medical Center’s programs to help address unmet needs in our community, she facilitates several support groups here at the hospital, including a new Alzheimer’s caregivers group, for which she has received special training from the Alzheimer’s Association.

Debbie is available to speak to groups and organizations. For more information, contact her at 724-450-7193.